Belle Isle, Detroit, Motown, RV Hall of Fame, and Cahokia Mounds

Visit Michigan and All its Lakes!

I grew up near Lake St. Clair.  Besides the Great Lakes there are hundreds of lakes in Michigan.  We caught up with friends one weekend at Indiana Dunes National Park on Lake Michigan.

Picture yourself Here!

Gorgeous paintings of animals outside the Visitor’s Center@

The Visitor’s Center is state of the art with helpful rangers!  Capturing the stunning beauty of the sand dunes as they kiss the lake is impossible. Your eyes can’t believe that anything can be so sparklingly beautiful.  Part of the excitement for the day was visiting the Bailly Homestead and Chelberg farm with lots of  farm animals. We also trekked into a dark forest of ancient trees to an unusual 200-year-old grave site.

Motown Record Company. Hitsville USA

How exciting!

Visiting Motown Museum in downtown Detroit was a superb highlight in Michigan.  My brother told us to take a gun.  Not so!  Hundreds of people were flocking to the two stitched-together houses on Grand River. Tom and I have watched videos about the music and musicians at Motown but had never considered how the record company functioned.  Nor, had we considered the millions of records it produced.  It finally sold for $61 million dollars.

Motown was more than sophisticated.  It had the music, but it also had the style.  There were people who recruited singers, taught them how to walk, talk, and to wear makeup.  They were taught manners, stage presence, and a fashion flare that made Motown one of the wealthiest record companies in the world.

We were there in that very recording studio!

Until I began studying music, I had never heard of “race music.”  Supposedly in the early 1950’s and 1960’s people did not want to hear music sung by African Americans.  Motown groups were so great that I never ever thought of race.  They were just talented people that sang tunes. We sang along to the music and danced to their beats.  We were not racists!  And my parents loved Elvis, who supposedly sang “race music!” Here is a video about the music!  Click here!

I lived only about 12 miles away from Motown headquarters and its music is still with me every day of my life.  There was the Jackson Five, Smokey Robinson, Stevie Wonder, Gladys Knight, Lionel Ritchie, The Temptations, The Supremes, and more.  And, we looked forward to hearing and seeing them dance on The Dick Clark Show.  Even this morning, every time I heard a Motown tune on my MP3 player, I walked a little  faster with a smile on my face!  Thank you Motown!!!!

Belle Isle and the New Detroit

Historic post card of Belle Isle!

Detroit was a safe and easy-going city when I was a kid.  We would take the bus downtown to department stores and shop for the day. Sometimes we would stop for a Cherry Coke and French fries before heading home.  When I was in seventh grade, I rode a bus by myself to the Wayne State University Library to work on a paper about the history of Egypt.  Those days seem like a myth now!

Another post card of Belle Isle.

After visiting Motown, I had to circle Detroit.  The Detroit I knew is mostly gone.

1950’s in Detroit. What a magnificent place to live!

We got a glimpse of Cobo Hall sitting on the Detroit River.  It has had a make-over.  Next it was a jaunt to Belle Isle.  Belle Isle was “the” place to go when I was young.  There was a zoo.  There was an amusement park.  There were flowers and cascading waterfalls.  There was a beach.  There was an arboretum.  It had an aquarium.  It reminded you of the gardens at the Palace of Versailles.  Today, there is nothing left of that beauty.  It has all been torn down, and in its place, there is a wasteland.  How sad! My brother told me that while we were there a man was murdered on the bridge going across to the island. Ouch!

Detroit today! No Federal’s Department Store, No Hudson’s, No Crowley’s!

RV Hall of Fame in Elkart, Indiana

Here is a home town video of the RV Museum.  Click here.

Mae West’s 1931 Chevy RV.

Fantastic! Mind-blowing! Beyond Belief!  This museum houses RV’s that go back to the first cars that were manufactured.  I took a hundred photos. It is a huge place but it should be three times larger.

Cahokia Mounds State Historic Site  (Click here to go to the website.)

Artist’s conception of Cahokia. The mounds are huge!

Cahokia was a welcomed stop just across the river from Saint Louis.  We were stunned by the size of the mounds that had been built so long ago. Cahokia museum is free but leave a donation if you decide to visit.  Here is a video for you:  Video

Imagining the people who lived at Cahokia. Why are Native Americans always shown with so little clothing? It gets cold in St. Louis today!

The museum is state of the art with an interesting video.  The archaeologists and anthropologists attempt to reconstruct the Mississippian culture.  (This takes a lot of guess-work!) If you have read a history of Missouri, you know that there was a huge mound exactly where St. Louis sits today.

Their website reads:  “The remains of the most sophisticated prehistoric native civilization north of Mexico are preserved at Cahokia Mounds State Historic Site. Within the 2,200-acre tract, located a few miles west of Collinsville, Illinois, lie the archaeological remnants of the central section of the ancient settlement that is today known as Cahokia.”  This is worth a visit!

Home at last!

Tom and I will be heading to Florida to take up residency soon!  We will split our time between Florida and Missouri, with, of course, a trip north during the heat of the summer!

As always, this post is copyrighted by Marla J. Selvidge

 

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