Folding Space in the Land of the Pueblos

Memories and the Worm Hole Back in Time.

Example of ancient Native American ruins sometimes called Anasazi or Puebloans

In the 1970’s I spent several weeks out West attempting to discover every Anasazi (The term is no longer used.) settlement I could find that was listed on a Native American map except for Mesa Verde only because the road was closed. Last year I finally got to Mesa Verde.

I took my old Chevy Vega down so many trails of dust and sand that I had to sell it when I returned home! The air filter was clogged with dirt and it started using a quart of oil a week after my 10,000 mile journey.

In the forty or so years since that epic adventure, archaeology has changed. Discoveries have been made and sites that I once visited have blossomed into destinations. They are no longer a few rocks at the end of a bumpy gravel road. There are visitor’s centers, paved roads, guided tours, and lots of stuff to buy.

The Best of Archaeology

This church is still large but you would not call it a cathedral today!

Two of the pueblo sites we visited near Santa Fe, New Mexico were Pecos National Historical Park and Bandelier National Monument. Both sent your imaginations into the stratosphere.

At Pecos the local indigenous people built a huge pueblo (town) that served 2,000 but were eventually subjugated by both the Spanish government and Franciscan priests who were seeking gold and land. Along side of the pueblo a Catholic church with scores of residences was built. The church was 150 feet long and its walls were 22 feet thick. (Sounds like a fort to me!) It was impressive! I am sure it was a sign that both God and country approved of the domination of these people. But the people did not approve and soon revolted. They did not want to be punished for practicing their own religion.  This revolt eventually led to the end of the pueblo.

It is truly remarkable to walk the length of the pueblo and to think about the people who lived there. We know so little about them, even today.  If I could fold space, I would visit them!

You could climb right up into the living room of one of the ancient ones.

Bandelier National Monument is a treasure that preserves both a pueblo and rock/cave dwellings. We know even less about these indigenous peoples who lived in the Frijoles Canyon. Volcanic dust created a landscape full of caves along Frijoles Creek. They have excavated a pueblo that dates back to around 1200 CE and have discovered the presence of peoples that date back 10,000 years.

Reconstructed home that was attached to the caves.

High about the pueblo are residences of people who lived in the caves. The caves were a much safer place to live because the Frijoles Creek below regularly floods and it protected them from approaching enemies. The people who lived in these caves built structures along side the walls that look like porches. There were holes in the stone walls which probably supported houses also. They entered the caves using a ladder and then pulled the ladder up with them. Some call them cliff dwellings.

This is a model of the pueblo below the homes on the cliffs.

We saw and visited similar caves at Mesa Verde last year but were watched closely by a park employee. Here we climbed up steps hundreds of feet about the pueblo down below — for almost a mile. The journey took us back in time. You could see smoke stains on the inside of the homes and some of them had created art work.

There were also two ball courts or kivas. WOW!

Yesterday we visited Wupatki National Monument. The park service has done a bang-up job (again) in allowing visitors to visit an ancient pueblo in spectacular surroundings. What a wonderful place to live!

 

Around 1969 I found this monument also at the end of a dusty sand road. It did not look the same today because of additional excavations, reconstruction,  and the building of a visitor center. I asked the park ranger if I was losing my mind. He told me that the entrance to the monument was on the other side and that the visitor center was being built in 1969. Today exploring the area was so easy. We drove right up to the monument on asphalt and took a hike all around it on level ground!!! So beautiful!

We are so lucky to live in a country that values the history of its peoples. What would we do without these wonderful places that inspire and educate us!?

Santa Fe

Artisan and Farmers Market in Santa Fe

One of the reasons we chose to visit Santa Fe was to spend a little time with Jim and his lovely partner Laura. Tom had known Jim for almost 20 years and bumped into him in several places around the globe. We had lunch with them and they extolled their love for Santa Fe. It is a small town, around 70,000, but offers fine restaurants, art, and architecture that they enjoy and admire. As they drove us around town, it was apparent that living in Santa Fe was a romantic adventure for them. This is where they have retired. And this is a place where Jim’s parents had lived.

Tom and I spent time at the Farmer’s and Artisan Market at The Railyard District. The experience was exhilarating. People were enthusiastic and kind. We bought lots of pastries and fresh veggies. But the prices were often exorbitant. Eggs were $6.00 and $8.00 a dozen. I bought two donuts for $6.00 and Tom bought a piece of strudel for $3.50. The prices for jewelry and art were out of our league. The cheapest pair of earrings I saw was $56. At our campground some of the folks told us that paintings in Santa Fe, on the cheap side, were about $14,000.

Lame Tourists

So when we came back to our campsite, we decided not to hoof our way around Santa Fe. There are wonderful churches and history that dates back 400 years but we were not in the mood for crowds. The town itself is small and the buildings mirror a pueblo. The shops are very close together and the sidewalks were full of people. We had been camping under the skies with miles of land around us and did not want to face the hustle and rush of trying to find a space on the sidewalk to stroll. I can’t imagine what it will be like when the tourist season arrives.

Taking Care of Your Pet.

Thought you might like to see how some full-timers manage their pets.  This is the first time we have seen something so elaborate. Look, there is a door for the dogs to come and go in the motorhome! Notice the fence and slide that gets them down to ground level.

Unique approach to managing pets!

As always this post is copyrighted by Marla J. Selvidge

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This entry was posted in Archaeology of the Southwest, Bandelier, Camping, National Park Service, Pecos, Route 66, Rving across America, Santa Fe, Uncategorized, Wupatki and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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